How to Design Deck Tiles over Concrete

Mar 8th

Deck tiles over concrete – There are several options for making your own concrete slabs, and depending on the appearance you go for, an idea can work better than another. This example assumes that you do not use a professional rubber mold or prefabricated concrete stamps, although they are good alternatives if you have them. Instead, we will use regular items found around the house, some basic tools and ready-mixed concrete are available at the DIY store.

Deck Tiles Over Concrete Patio

Instructions

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Determine the size of deck tiles over concrete you want to make and find containers of the desired size. (Rubber is best because it is flexible and easy to remove, but carton works well and can be thrown. Plastic or other rigid containers should have bottoms slightly smaller than the peaks so that the plates can be removed without catching.) Coat the inside of the containers (they form) with a nice spray of non-stick cooking oil. Select decorative elements. Leaves make very beautiful patterns for concrete slabs that make other natural objects like stones, shells and so on, but whatever you want, from glass to machine parts or clockwork works. Be creative!

Draw the outlines of your shapes on a paper. Place the templates on a table and arrange what you plan to include as decoration in the contours until you get the patterns that you like. Mix concrete according to the manufacturer’s instructions using a bulk carrier (too large) or a 5-liter bucket (for smaller quantities). A hack works best for mixing in a wheelbarrow. Use a filler to pour small amounts of deck tiles over concrete into the molds and spread the concrete evenly until they are 1 to 2 inches deep (as desired for your application). Vibrate the molds by lifting and releasing them from a few inches above the table surface a few times. (This helps to remove air bubbles.)

Smooth the surface as well as possible, and then transfer your decorative objects to concrete shapes in the same direction as they were on the table. When the concrete begins to harden but not yet cured – a few minutes to a couple of hours, depending on local temperature and humidity conditions – wipe over the surface to remove excess concrete and bleed from decorative surfaces. Cover a damp cloth and allow curing for at least 24 hours. Deform your boats tile by turning the mold upside down over a towel and gently tapping the container until the plate drops out.

Tips and warnings

Many items can be used as “stamps” to make impression in concrete without embedding them. Leaves, twigs, shells, toys, etc. are all worth trying. Concrete is extremely corrosive (it can cause corrosion damage), so wear gloves and goggles while mixing and pouring. If you want to use handprints in concrete, wear latex gloves or apply a coat of Vaseline on the skin, then immediately wash with soap and water to remove both concrete and lubricants. Fight like to put a pot or puppy print in your tiles! Concrete burns sensitive footsteps and lick it can make your pet very sick. For more safety tips on working with concrete, read Work safely with concrete from Portland Cement Association.